Design, development and implementation of a mobile learning strategy for undergraduate medical education

  • Maria Toro-Troconis School of Medicine, Imperial College London, Sir Alexander Fleming building, Room 165, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ, United Kingdom.
  • Caroline Morton School of Medicine, Imperial College London, Medical Education Research Unit (MERU), London, United Kingdom
  • Taylor Bennie School of Medicine, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom
  • Charlie Leppington Imperial College London, Central Library, London, United Kingdom
  • Ashish Hemani School of Medicine, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom
  • Martin Lupton School of Medicine, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom

Abstract


This paper describes the process of introducing a mobile learning strategy into a medical school by issuing iPads to clinical students. Data was collected from focus groups, surveys and by engaging a number of student “iPad champions”. Students had a positive attitude and experience with the iPads for learning and highlighted some areas for improvement particularly for electronic sign-off. Introduction of mobile technology into medical education is proving to be popular with medical students. Early adoption of mobile technology brings medical students closer to the digital healthcare environment which is rapidly adopting the use of electronic health records, electronic xray and laboratory order and online evidence-based practice tools to support patient care.

References

1. ICT facts and figures 2013. The world in 2013.
Geneva: International Telecommunication
Union; 2013. http://www.itu.int/en/ITUD/Statistics/Documents/facts/ICTFactsFigures2013-e.pdf

2. Ducut E, Fontelo P. Mobile devices in health
education: Current use and practice. Journal of
Computing in Higher Education. 2009;20(2):59-68.

3. George P, Dumenco L, Dollase R, Taylor JS,
Wald HS, Reis SP. Introducing technology into
medical education: Two pilot studies. Patient
Education and Counselling Journal.
2013;93:522-4.

4. Davies B, Rafique J, Vincent T, Fairclough J,
Packer M, Vincent R, Haq I. Mobile Medical
Education (MoMed) – how mobile information
resources contribute to learning for undergraduate
clinical students – a mixed methods study. BMC
Medical Education. 2012;12:1.
http://www.biomedcentral.com/1472-6920/12/1

5. Mooney JS, Cappelli T, Byrne-Davis L, Lumsden
CJ. How we developed eForms: An electronic
form and data capture tool to support
assessment in mobile medical education.
Medical teacher. 2014;36(12):1032-7.

6. Nuss M, Hill J, Cervero R, Gaines J, Middendorf B. Real-time use of the iPad by third-year
medical students for clinical decision support
and learning: a mixed methods study. Journal of
Community Hospital Internal Medicine
Perspective. 2014;4:25184.
http://dx.doi.org/10.3402/jchimp.v4.25184

7. Imperial College London (2013). iPad Project
(2013-2015). http://bit.ly/1EUr6Qv

8. Toro-Troconis M, Hemani A, Murphy K.
Learning Design in the 21st Century – Blended
Learning Design Tool (BLEnDT©). Journal of
Interactive Media in Education. 2015. The Open
University (under review)

9. Elleway R. The informal and hidden curricula of
mobile device use in medical education.
eMedical Teacher. 2014;36:89-91.
Published
2016-03-08
How to Cite
1.
Toro-Troconis M, Morton C, Bennie T, Leppington C, Hemani A, Lupton M. Design, development and implementation of a mobile learning strategy for undergraduate medical education. JEAHIL [Internet]. 8Mar.2016 [cited 18Oct.2019];11(2). Available from: http://ojs.eahil.eu/ojs/index.php/JEAHIL/article/view/38
Section
Feature Articles